Little Holey Vengeance Pedal Board – Build Phase 2

The Project Continues

Today we continued our build process on the Little Holey Vengeance pedal board.

First up we smoothed out the putty we applied last night to the areas splintered by the drill bit. Then we proceeded to cut out the main pedal board.

All Cut Out

All Cut Out

All Cut Out

All Cut Out

We attempted to use a 10″ table saw and a small band saw to cut this out. I feel tools like this give better accuracy than the hand held tools like a circular saw and jigsaw. Unfortunately, the stationary tools I have are gifts from my grandfather (when my grandmother told him to get them out of the basement) so they turned out to be sub-par for the job. Both of them were just too small to use effectively on such a large panel. The band saw was especially bad. It was so underpowered that it bogged down in 3/4″ plywood.

So inevitably we resorted to a circular saw and a jigsaw. A circular saw isn’t difficult to get a straight cut with it you take the time to clamp a straight edge to the work surface and run the foot of the saw along it to maintain a straight cut. Jigsaws however are a real pain. Since the tip has no support to keep it in line they like to bend as you cut and give you a slanted cut from the top of the piece to the bottom. We had to be careful to maintain pressure in the right direction so when it inevitably angled on us it happened in such a way that we could sand it flat with the table top belt sander.

So once it was all cut out we took it over to my oscillating belt/spindle sander and smoothed out the edges and rounded the corners. We used the spindles to round out the inside corners and try to get a fairly straight edge inside the handles. They aren’t perfect but they are decent. I just don’t have any good tools for smoothing them out any better. I would plane them a bit if it was a solid piece of wood, but plywood will just splinter to pieces.

Once we got the power sanding completed we hand sanded the rest of it to smooth it out as much as possible. Then we moved on to rounding over the edges with a router. I used a 1/4″ round over bit on a Bosch Colt palm router. Here are the results.

Routed Edges

Routed Edges

Routed Edges

Routed Edges

It’s starting to look more like a pedal board now.

We set the main board aside at this point and cut out the remaining pieces. We used the same methods as before to drill, cut, sand, and route the boards. We left the legs square and unrouted, but routed both sides of the top. Here are all the pieces together.

All pieces cut and routed.

All pieces cut and routed.

All pieces cut and routed.

All pieces cut and routed.

Notice all the tools in the background. They were all pretty well worthless for this project. The orange one is my spindle sander, which has got to be one of the most useful tools I’ve ever bought.

This is a closeup of the additional pieces.

Legs and Top

Legs and Top

Here is another overall shot of the main board.

Main Board

Main Board

Finally, here is roughly what it’s expected to look like when it’s all put together.

Rough Layout

Rough Layout

That’s it for this phase.

Some notes and a preview of Phase 3

Overall it’s turning out well. I can certainly see why they charge so much for the professionally made models. This is a very time consuming process. I’m sure it would go faster and turn out much cleaner with the correct tools, but I’m not in any position to outfit a full fledged wood working shop. At least you know it’s possible to do this with a few basic power tools.

So far I’m pretty pleased with the design. The only thing I would really change would be to make the handles a bit thicker. Once they are cut out and rounded over they feel rather thin. Right now they have no issue supporting the weight of the board, which by the way is turning out even lighter than I expected it to. We’ll have to see how it feels once it’s loaded up with pedals and a power supply. I still think it’s plenty sturdy to support the weight. I just tend to second guess myself a lot.

The next phase will consist of a lot of sanding and filling to get the wood as smooth as possible. Then I’ll apply a few coats of lacquer sanding sealer and fine sand it in preparation for the color coat. I’ll be using Duplicolor automotive lacquer in aerosol cans. I still need to pick a color scheme. Stay tuned for the next phase, but keep in mind that it’ll probably be a while before any details go up on that one. It’s going to be a long drawn out process.

Thanks for reading.

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